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View Full Version : what do you think is the right time to start training??


huntingmarsh
03-15-2003, 09:59 PM
When do you guys start you training on your pups. I've been told that when they are 49 days old or 7 weeks old is when there brain is developed to start comprehinding comands. Some very respected feild trial trainers start training at 2 years or so, to me I think thats to long to wait because I want to hunt my pup as soon as it can. tell me what you guys think. because i'm getting my pup this friday:Art: . and I just want to make sure on everything i'm gonna do.

Corey :uh: :uh: :GM: :hest:

dukdog7
03-16-2003, 06:28 AM
I prefer to start training at 7 weeks. That is also when I prefer to pick up pup from the breeder. Now when I say training at 7 weeks I am not talking about straping on a collar and throwing 100 yrd marks. Training should be seen as teaching. Not reprimanding. I begin formal training with dogs around 6 months, when their adult teeth are in.

I would suggest if you haven't yet you should look into some books on training methods that fit your needs, or contact a local professional and start a good relationship. It is always nice to have a knowledgable ear to tug on whhen you get into trouble.

Good Luck and Good Training.

Chuck Williamson

Sandy
03-17-2003, 05:31 AM
Chuck is correct. I start out w/a 7 week pup in the hallway w/a rolled up sock. Close all the doors and there is no way he can get away from you. And this is the time to socialize the pup. Take him riding w/you, all over! A lot of the later formal training will be based upon your earlier socialization and "play training" that you do from 7 wks. to 6 months! Have fun and don't get mad at this stage of the game. Pups just beginning to learn HOW to learn!

Sandy

JK
03-17-2003, 06:46 AM
if you can, forget about thinking your pup is supposed to this or that at a certain age. i have a young chesapeake that has highly benefitted from expert advice i saught. the best advice i have ever recieved is this: expose your puppy to everything you can...especially those things that are associated with hunting such as: water, thick cover, birds, logs, etc. taking your pup on long trail walks will expose your pup to these things. get him using his nose and eyes. walk through thick cover so pup follows you through it. walk through puddles and creeks. cross logs dont go around them. use lots of treats so that everything is fun and games. you are actually teaching pup to be familiar with these things so when the time comes to RETRIEVE within these obstacles, it will be second nature. use short easy retrieves to keep your pup interested in retrieving, but dont expect or repremand too much. retrieving should be fun, but dont over do it. be patient!

JK

Roxy
03-18-2003, 01:58 PM
I got my pup "Roxy" at 6 1/2 weeks, she was sitting, staying and healing at 7 1/2 weeks. I had never trained a dog before but knew I had to do it if I wanted the loyalty...I read all of the Wolters books - Gun Dog, Bird dog and Water dog...gun dog and bird dog were the most helpful...Along the way you may have to get creative if certain things dont work but for the most part everything in those books work, and they're entertaining to read too. Roxy hunted her first season at 6 months, she was leary at first but got really excited when she saw the other dogs working. I let her play the first season, no repremending. She's awesome now and she's only 2 1/2. I agree with the others, take your pup everywhere...I use to leave her in the car when I went out on the weekends and if I had to take a taxi home :Rich: she would ride in the taxi, she came everywhere with me...Just remember that your pup is a pup...I see to many guys repremending to much when they are little and it can ruin them...every dog is different so try different things if one way doesn't work. If you can make everything fun they want to please you more...I have to say though regarding the "treats" I rarely gave her treats so that she wouldn't associate doing a good thing with a treat everytime...they need to learn to listen to you because they want to...again, every dog is different but teaching a dog that if they work they get something yummy is a pain later on...Roxy likes a good pat as much as a treat. Good luck and post pictures when you get your pup.

huntingmarsh
03-18-2003, 03:09 PM
Thanks alot you guys, i've been reading up on water dog and watchign some movies on trainin. From all that I've read and watched they have told me to try not to use the treats because when your in 4 lairs of cloths your not gonna wanna dig for the treats. Once I get her i'll post some picks. thanks

Corey

huntingmarsh
03-18-2003, 03:14 PM
OH yeah and another thing is that most books and movies have told me to use a wistle to train my dogs but i'm not really sure I want to us one because we can use our wistle call for callin in ducks. what do you think?

Sandy
03-19-2003, 05:48 AM
and it doesn't sound like a duck or interfere w/any hunts. I use a pealess Fox 40. Single toot or blast means sit, three means come back in. Thats about it. In the blind I still use voice or hand signals, but when the dog is 100 yds, out, you cannot beat a whistle.

shootem
03-19-2003, 05:49 AM
You have gotten some very good advice. I will add to take your young dog on walks not only in the country but in the city as well. Take him to parks or out door shows. This will help get him use to more people other dogs, cars traffic and many more noiseís than are not found in the country. This will be a big help if you ever run hunt tests. Yes you should use a whistle in training but that will come later in training. A good book to help with your training would be The Ten Minute Retriever by John and Amy Dahl very good book. As far as the book water dog, give it to some one who doesn't own a dog. In my opinion it is a very poor book. And please donít be afraid to ask for help from this forum or any of its members.

Daffysdoom
03-20-2003, 02:59 PM
I would like to reccomend a video that would give you a good view of how things work with a pup, along with do's and dont's. "Sound Beginings" by Jackie Mertins. My advice is take your time, be patient, and let your dog show you what he/she can do at what time, and proceed from there. Find a trainer, or training group that you can work with, and they can usually help you out with things you are doing that you may not notice. Enjoy your pup!

JK
03-20-2003, 06:24 PM
sorry to have mislead you on the treats. it may not apply to all puppy learning programs, but it is definately applicable to puppys that need a liitle extra coaxing. my advice on treats comes from some highly respectable, nationally known trainers.
treats can do great things like kindergarden casting drills. once pup learns to sit use treats to begin learning hand signals...left and right. when my pup was going through this, i would remote sit him, simulate a right cast signal with my hand, tossing a hot dog chunk to the right. then repeat to the left. every now and then, id use a puppy dummy or a duck wing in place of the treat. the key to using treats IMO is to take the treat out of the equation sometimes. this may not suite every training philosophy, but if your puppy has a stubborn temperment, it may help...especially when you are about to get pissed off and frustrated. it did for me and i dont regret it.
formal training will work out the problems you might think it will create. right now your dog is a puppy not a soldier. expectations are usually too high cause we want our dogs to be the best and we are afraid if they do something wrong while they are young it will lead to major inefficiencies. let your puppy be a puppy, and do yourself this favor....order mike lardy's total retriever training video set. it is kinda expensive, but "totally" worth it. you wont find a better training program.

JK

dukdog7
03-21-2003, 09:18 AM
huntingmarsh

I would highly reccomond using a whistle. It is the only effective means of communicating with your dog at very long distances. There are many different whistles to choose from. find one you like and is proven in the training world and stick with it. Dogs are very keen with their ears and they will get used to the specific sound of you whistle. Through the training your dog will become accustomed to your specific whistle and it will not be confused by any other whistles.

Good Luck and Good Training

Chuck Williamson

shootem
03-21-2003, 01:27 PM
my advice on treats comes from some highly respectable, nationally known trainers.

Care to name those trainers!!!

Most retriever trainers will not take a young dog till it is 6 months old or older.
In my opinion treat training a young dog is a very poor method of teaching unless of course you are training for the show ring and not hunting.

Nevada Jim
03-21-2003, 02:05 PM
Make sure that you pass basic obedience first ...

shootem
03-24-2003, 05:50 AM
Hey JF you have given some very good training advice on beginning retriever training. I would love to sit down and talk at length with you some day.:TT:

huntingmarsh
04-01-2003, 07:43 PM
Today I was alittle bored so I woke marsh up and started playin with her so he was interested in me and then I tried gettin her to sit with out holdin the collar but she wouldn't have it, so I got a hotdog and cut it up into little peices and started teasin her. I finally would get her attention and put the peice of hotdog right above her till she would sit and then I would give the command sit. After about 4 minutes she was sitting with out even giving her a treat. I guess treats might help but I think i'll stop after she gets bigger:BM:. I guess that tells ya you gotta train you dog somehow????

Corey